‘Low fat’ products could be the
cause of Britain’s obesity crisis

A headline aired on LBC Radio Station this morning has suggested that the cause of Britain’s obesity problem could be that we have received incorrect dietary advice for decades. The National Obesity Forum and the Public Health Collaboration have produced a report stating that the nation’s beliefs concerning what makes a healthy diet are false. Although it has been assumed that low-fat diets are the key to good health, now commentators claim that fats are essential to a balanced lifestyle and do not encourage weight gain. High fat foods such as avocados are in fact beneficial, while the real culprits are processed foods labeled as ‘low fat’ that often contain hidden sugars to compensate in taste for removed fat.

low fat products contain hidden sugar causing obesity

Dr. Aseem Malhotra, founding member of the Public Health Collaboration, claimed that guidelines promoting low fat products are ‘perhaps the biggest mistake in modern medical history resulting in devastating consequences for public health’. Instead, he promotes the consumption of fats ‘to get slim’. Indeed, the BBC documentary aired in 2015 titled ‘The Truth About Sugar’ explored the great extent to which sugar is hidden in processed foods such as low fat ready meals. The show followed the journey of four volunteers who slashed their sugar intake in a bid to lose weight. The results were impressive: 3 of the volunteers lost almost a stone each.

Fiona Phillips sugar and obesity

Fiona Phillips, presenter of BBC Documentary ‘The Truth About Sugar’, highlights hidden sugar in ‘low fat’ products

Similarly, recently celebrity chef Jamie Oliver launched his ‘war on sugar’ through his campaign aiming to underline sugar as the leading contributor to health problems in the UK owing to its persistent presence in supposedly healthy options in supermarkets. He has shown great support for George Osborne’s agenda to introduce a tax on sugar to reduce obesity that is to be implemented in 2018.

Jamie Oliver sugar causes obesity

Jamie Oliver tackles the UK’s obesity problem

Instead of choosing products branded as ‘low fat’ or ’low cholesterol’, it seems that the way forward is a balanced diet free of added sugars and enriched with whole foods including those high in healthy fats.

Cut down on
sugar for 2016!

You know how bad it is to eat sugar but it’s hard to stop. The latest research has proved that sugar is more addictive than tobacco, more dangerous than alcohol, more fattening than fat. You may not be eating Oreos by the roll or guzzling cans of  Coke, but that doesn’t mean sugar’s absent from your diet. Nowadays added sugar is everywhere even in a food that doesn’t  taste sweet such as bread, sauces or crisps. In this article we will give you all the tips to eat less sweet food!

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Sugar  is an addiction like cocaine! It can be really hard to stop eating it!  first we have to understand why? If you’re addicted to sugar, there is  an emotional component. You’re craving and overindulging in sugar for a reason – you may be eating sugar to care for your emotions, to manage stress, or to care for your emotional, psychological or relational needs.

So now lower your sugar intake with these 8 easy ways:

1. Read the label

You will realise how often sugar is included to foods. Ingredients are listed in order of how much exists in the product, so if sugar is  near the top, that’s a red flag.

2. Don’t look for just the word ‘sugar’

Sugar hides under several sneaky names, including high fructose corn syrup, dried cane syrup, invert sugar, molasses, sucrose (or any word ending in “-ose”), brown rice syrup, honey, and maple syrup. 

3. Buy the right products

Once you know where sugar hides, you can start making changes. Buy foods labeled “no added sugar” or “unsweetened.”

4. Take your time

In cutting down on sugar takes time. As we said sugar is like a drug so the beginning will be hard but the easiest way is reduce your consumption of sugar. If you normally put two packets of sugar in your coffee, for instance, try one for a week, then half, and finally add only a splash of milk.

5. Protein,protein…

Studies showed that sugar doesn’t cause proper satiety but it does make you hungry. So to avoid any craving, the best things to do is:

  • Eating breakfast every morning
  • Including fat and protein in your meals
  • Eating regular meals
  • Drinking more water

6. Sugar free, no calorie…?

Be careful don’t be tempting to buy the products with sugar free or no calorie write on it. The processed food manufactures are clever instead to use normal sugar they use aspartame or other substitute but they are even worst. When you eat something sweet, your body expects calories and nutrition, but artificial sugars don’t give your body those things.

7. Add flavours to your meals

Adding flavours will help you to eat less carbohydrate foods. Skip the flavored oatmeal and add a sweet kick with cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger.

8. Don’t drink it

Even drinks that are considered healthy can contain more of the sweet stuff than you’re supposed to have in an entire day. Case in point: “enhanced” waters (eight teaspoons per bottle), bottled iced teas (more than nine teaspoons per bottle), energy drinks (almost seven teaspoons per can), bottled coffee drinks (eight teaspoons per bottle), and store-bought smoothies (more than a dozen teaspoons—for a small). 

9. Indulge yourself

It’s okay to have sometime a little treat but it needs to be occasionally.

 

NO ADDED SUGAR – NO PRESERVATIVES – NEVER HEATED

RAW-for-website

 

Article from www.health.com